More information on I-220

Even though vientology is about sharing information, the skilled vientologist is still motivated to “scoop” the other sites by finding out information no one else has published yet.

However, sometimes no one else has found out anything about subject X because subject X is wrong, and you end up with egg on your face.

That’s why I wanted to find out more about Birmingham’s mysterious interstate 220.

You may remember seeing it on an earlier “Yellow Book” scan I posted from Froggie:

Urban routes, Birmingham

Urban routes, Birmingham

I want to clarify that the red numerals are my annotations, and are not original with the document.  So the northeastern bypass is definitely there, but “I-220” was my supposition.

So is there any real evidence about I-220?

I did find an interchange diagram in the ALDOT archives:

Planned Interstate 220 interchange, at Center Point Rd and Main St, Pinson, Ala.

Planned Interstate 220 interchange, at Center Point Rd and Main St, Pinson, Ala.

That is definitely I-220, at AL 75, with Main St at the bottom of the diagram. Dated 1960.

Saving the best for last… in the DOT photo archives, in an undated folder, I find this:

This undated, unsourced photo appears to show the end of an old I-220 freeway in Birmingham.

This undated, unsourced photo appears to show the end of an old I-220 freeway in Birmingham. The craftsmanship on the sign is not the best.

So what? It was not only planned, but built? Even a non-roadgeek would have to ask, “Well, where did it go?”

One final bit of information is from Cam Finnegan, a professor of civil engineering at UAB:

When I was little, we lived in Alton, and would drive up to Chalkville for pizza. Pikey’s Pizza (I think it’s called Pasquale’s now) had the best, really the only good pizza around, unless you wanted to drive all the way into the city. We took Chalkville Rd. from I-59 to get there. Back then (~1980) Chalkville Rd was 4 lanes divided like today, but there was nothing built up there as you climbed up the hill. It was like a freeway, and there were some freeway signs but I didn’t pay attention to the details. But I do remember asking Pop why the highway just stopped and didn’t keep going. He said it was politicians screwing things up.

It’s like they gave up on building a freeway there, and just let it become a boulevard. Hope this helps.

Without a doubt, there’s much more that needs to be unearthed about Interstate 220. But I figured I’d share what I have to date.

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2 Responses to “More information on I-220”

  1. Ray Says:

    Wow… I have an old Alabama I-220 sign in my garage (I live in NC now), bought it on ebay around 2006. I always thought it was a mistake because there was no such highway. Now I guess it’s more valuable?

  2. Derek Moser Says:

    Where was I-220 supposed to hook up with I-20? Sincerely, I-278.

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